colossus webpage.jpg

 

Jay Price

Grand Piano, 2017, Printmaking, 506cm x 240cm, Jay Price

Grand Piano, 2017, Printmaking, 506cm x 240cm, Jay Price

Jay’s collaborations extend beyond the art world in search of human relationships that influence and enlighten new perspectives and ideas. Her communication is precarious between the viewer and herself. It is sadistic vulnerability – taking risks with identity, exposing intimate histories, loss of self, and presentation that provokes judgement and fear of that judgement. A range of responses have emanated from this, from being laughed and shouted at, exposed to aggressive psychical responses, to being confessed to.

'I have had the wonderful, terrifying and tragic experience of psychosis; watching electric lights drip into shadows, being more than the sum of my body. Through in-depth self-analysis, self-portraiture emerged as the centre of my practice. Activism moved into my work in a quiet formthat reflects the communities it references, and I investigate turning the personal/alieninto the universal/relatable. The process has to reflect the substance and the constant dilemma of exposing psychotic intimacies’, and unpleasant decisions of how much. There are no shortcutsto content when it comes to my work. When I take an easy route the work suffers and the message has no backbone to travel on. The process is obsessive and repetitive; it’s arduous and begins as physically uncomfortable, pushing through to agony, because it has to be.’ - Jay Price

jpriceart.com

 

Henry Hussey

The Witness, 2017, Bronze Sculpture, Henry Hussey

The Witness, 2017, Bronze Sculpture, Henry Hussey

 Henry Hussey has been creating deeply personal and emotionally raw artworks for several years, mainly through the paradoxically laboured medium of textiles. Whether through a steadily growing vocabulary of  quasi-mythological symbols, or in embroidered lines of text extracted from performative situations, he has sought to create expressions of perceived truth in response to aggravating relationships and events from his life.

'The works I have created for Colossus draw upon Paradise Lost and the paintings by William Blake’s for the Book Of Revelation. The undercurrent of despondency and upheaval we experience on a daily basis with this sense we are on the verge of collapse.  The conflicts we are directly involved in yet are pushed to the periphery, as they are not convenient to our cultures mortality and perception of itself. The human form represented in a contorted and unnerving manner revealing the prevailing darkness that has come to define us.’ - Henry Hussey 

 

henryhussey.co.uk

 

Augustine Carr

Detail of Lost At The Fair, 2017, by Augustine Carr 

Detail of Lost At The Fair, 2017, by Augustine Carr 

 The work of Augustine Carr crosses several registers, combining painting, sculpture, print, photography, digital scanning and film. A recurring device however, is the process of enlargement. Small and intimate paintings and sculptures are enlarged to the scale of colossi, revealing unseen details while imbuing objects with an emotivity that is both intimate and gigantic. This process of magnification generates a distance and objectification in the work but it also offers up an uncanny proximity. His subject matter employs both humour and bathos.

For this show, I have made a large cup and two enlarged painted book covers. The cup was modelled in one hand in plasticine, in a minute or so and was then digitally enlarged, so the asymmetry is amplified and takes on a life of its own, sitting somewhere betweenmyth and fantasy. The lumpen character of the cup is both brutish and gigantic so I like it’s title 'Glanz auf der Nase’, which translates as a ‘glance at the nose’- which came about after an accident in my studio, where the oil of the original plasticine maquette seeped into a Freud text on the Fetish. The two prints are photographic enlargements of painted children’s book covers. The titles of the works are the titles of the books. They are both abstract and material and work on many levels’. - Augustine Carr

augustinecarr.com